Nottdance 2022 – Julie Cleves and Robbie Synge: To Earth

A photo of Julie Cleves and Robbie Synge outside under a bright blue sky. They are side-by-side, Julie is in her wheelchair and Robbie is standing and carrying a large flat piece of wood. They are heading down a path and away from the camera towards hills in the distance.
Julie Cleves and Robbie Synge. Photo: Scott Green
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As part of Nottdance 2022, Nottingham Contemporary will host To Earth, an intimate performance by Julie Cleves and Robbie Synge that invites the audience on a journey exploring friendship, cooperation, time and space.

Together, Julie and Robbie weave physical actions, film and simply fabricated wooden objects to reveal a personal story and offer a framework for broader conversation. Spanning over a decade, their practice is shaped by a friendship and adventurous spirit that explores where and how they are able to share time and space together.

Held as a gathering for a small audience, Julie and Robbie perform a journey at a pace that invites us all to slow down, embodying cooperation to and from the earth.

About the Event

Tickets are £2 and booked via the Nottdance 2022 website.

Book tickets for Weds 5 Oct here

Book tickets for Thurs 6 Oct here


This is a seated performance, if you require accessible seating please contact us by emailing info@nottinghamcontemporary.org or phoning 0115 948 9750.
The duration of the event is approximately 90 minutes.

This event aims to be as inclusive and accessible as possible. Performances will be supported by a British Sign Language (BSL) interpreter and the artists will use audio description within the piece.
The performance has no darkness, loud noises or flashing lights and audience members are encouraged to speak or make noise if they wish.

The artists will offer a touch tour and other information for visually impaired audience members. Please let us know your requirements when you book your ticket.

Nottingham Contemporary is a physically accessible building and our aim is to be inclusive for all. You can find information about getting here and our facilities here.
If you have any questions around access or have specific access requirements we can accommodate, please get in touch with us by emailing info@nottinghamcontemporary.org or phoning 0115 948 9750.

Julie Cleves and Robbie Synge
Spanning over a decade, Julie and Robbie’s practice is shaped by a friendship and adventurous spirit that explores where and how they are able to share time and space together.

Julie and Robbie’s practice investigates how they can be/sit/move together in different physical places and terrains. As a result, they design and make objects to help them overcome access challenges. Their actions are collected through film documentation and provide a context for sharing their practice and the many themes arising in performances and discussions.


Julie Cleves is a London-based performance and dance artist. Julie initially studied BA (Hons) Fine Art and MA Art and Design in Leeds. Increasing her physical practice and training, Julie has worked with a number of dance and theatre companies nationally and internationally including Graeae, Mark Brew, Scottish Dance Theatre and SPINN (Sweden).

Robbie Synge works with physical and choreographic forms to investigate the potentials of different human bodies, other species and physical features. Based in an area of on-going landscape restoration in the Highlands, he is often occupied with connections between the wellbeing of people and of the land and other species. His projects tend to pursue long-term working relationships with people of broad ages and relationships to arts.

Nottdance is Nottingham's festival of choreographic ideas foregrounding new works, discourse and research with art activating public discussion around what is urgent now.

Safety during your visit

Due to COVID precautions, please do not attend this event if you/someone in your household is currently COVID-19 positive, has suspected symptoms, or is awaiting test results.

Staff and visitors are welcome to wear a face covering in all areas.

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