Marvin Gaye Chetwynd

Installation view, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Nottingham Contemporary, 2014. Photo David Sillitoe.
Installation view, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Nottingham Contemporary, 2014. Photo David Sillitoe.
  • Installation view, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Nottingham Contemporary, 2014. Photo David Sillitoe.
  • Installation view, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Nottingham Contemporary, 2014. Photo David Sillitoe.

Marvin Gaye Chetwynd’s sculptures and installations often start as handmade props, costumes and sets for her joyful, anarchic performances. They acquire an afterlife in exhibition spaces, occasionally animated by amateur actors and professional dancers, as they will be at Nottingham Contemporary.

Chetwynd is influenced by popular performing traditions such as medieval mummer plays, carnivals, communes, drag acts and political demonstrations, as well as the history of performance in avant-garde art. She is at home with the classics and with popular culture – and she uses one to give new meaning to the other. Her performances have referred to the ideas, images and storylines of Giotto, John Milton, Charles Dickens, Karl Marx and Dante, for example, but also Meatloaf, The Addams Family, Star Wars and Starship Troopers. Brought up on film sets (her mother is an Oscar-winning production designer), and studying both anthropology and fine art at university, Chetwynd moves easily between folk traditions, sci-fi, 60s Happenings and contemporary moral issues.

Installation view, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Nottingham Contemporary, 2014. Photo David Sillitoe.
Installation view, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Nottingham Contemporary, 2014. Photo David Sillitoe.
Installation view, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Nottingham Contemporary, 2014. Photo David Sillitoe.
Installation view, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Nottingham Contemporary, 2014. Photo David Sillitoe.
Installation view, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, Nottingham Contemporary, 2014. Photo David Sillitoe.