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© See Red Women's Workshop

© See Red Women's Workshop

Image credit: So Long As Women Are Not Free The people Are Not Free (1978) © See Red Women's Workshop

Image credit: So Long As Women Are Not Free The people Are Not Free (1978) © See Red Women's Workshop

© See Red Women's Workshop

© See Red Women's Workshop

Events - Talks

Wednesday Walkthrough

See Red Women's Workshop

12 Dec 2018

2-2.45pm
 
 
Join us for a different perspective on our exhibition as artists, experts, researchers and academics give short talks in their field of expertise relating to the concepts explored in our two solo exhibitions. 
 
Wednesday Walkthroughs are 45min talks, every other Wednesday at 2pm or 6pm. See more walkthroughs here.
 
 
Two founding members of See Red Women’s Workshop will talk about their work exhibited in the exhibition. See Red Women’s Workshop are known for their posters combating the negative images of womxn in advertising and the media. Join them for an exhibition walkthrough.
 
 
Free entry
 
No need to book -  just drop in.
 
 
See Red Women’s Workshop was founded in 1974: they wanted to use their skills to combat negative images of women and to produce propaganda for the women’s liberation movement. They aimed to promote women’s empowerment and to challenge the impact of gender stereotyping and sexism. Using humour and reality-checks, they set out to design and print posters that were accessible and looked good. 
 
At the time, silk-screening posters were the quickest and cheapest way of getting their messages across. Working collectively, no hierarchy, no one individual taking credit was important to them: sharing tasks, designs, skills and knowledge. Funds came from the sale of posters, calendars and service printing. The posters explored the personal experiences of women – the personal is political - from housework, childcare, and sexuality, to sexism and racism, and to women’s roles in wider struggles for change. There were more than 45 women in the collective, over 16 years.  
 
There has been a recent resurgence of interest in See Red’s posters, from galleries and museums to zines and design festivals and — especially closest to their hearts— from young women artists/activists, and a huge range of women’s groups. Their posters seem able to speak to different generations, although it indicates, as if we were in any doubt, that the struggle for women’s freedom and equality is far from won. 
 
 
 

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