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Image by Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll

Image by Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll

Image of prison graffiti from Kilmainham Gaol. Image credit Laura McAtackney

Image of prison graffiti from Kilmainham Gaol. Image credit Laura McAtackney

Image by Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll

Image by Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll

Image of prison graffiti from Kilmainham Gaol. Image credit Laura McAtackney

Image of prison graffiti from Kilmainham Gaol. Image credit Laura McAtackney

Events - Courses

Prison Photography Reframed

Object and Method Workshop

11 May 2018

This one-day workshop aims to bring together photographers, historians, criminologists and anyone interested in questions around the ethics of representation within the context of incarceration and detention. We will also be considering photography at sites of defunct prisons whether preserved as ruins or restored as museum or gallery.
 
For Speaker Biographies click More>> below.
 
In collaboration with the Global Heritage: Science, Management and Development seminar series at Nottingham Trent University.
 
11am-5pm
Free. Booking Required
 
 
 
 
Programme:
 
10.30am Registration 
 
11.00am-12.30pm 
 
Welcome
 
SESSION 1. Capturing the Carceral Space
 
Laura McAtackney, Aarhus University, Denmark
Using photography to uncover female experiences of political imprisonment at Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin 
 
Sophie Fuggle, Nottingham Trent University
In the ruins of the penal colony
 
Claire Reddleman, Nottingham Trent University
Viewing the penalscape: using photography as producer and consumer
 
12.30pm BREAK FOR LUNCH (lunch not provided, see recommendations here)
 
2.00-3.30pm
 
SESSION 2. Ethics of Representation
 
Maryse Tennant, Canterbury ChristChurch University
The Pain of Others: Photographs, the Prison and Suffering
 
Charles Fox, Nottingham Trent University
Kandal Provincial Prison
 
3.30pm COFFEE (provided)
 
4.00-5.00pm
 
Session 3. Reframing Incarceration
 
Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll, University of Birmingham
Kunst Macht Frei: On the imprisonment of art in institutions
 
Open Discussion
 
Close
 
 

Speaker Biographies
 
 
Charles Fox is a British-born photographer, currently dividing his time between the UK and Cambodia, where he has been working since 2005. His long-term projects are focusing on the legacy of conflict and colonialism, looking at its multiple manifestations and how the present is affected by the rulings and actions of the past. His work has received wide international publicity, on the BBC, The Sunday Times, GEO Germany, The National Geographic, Time magazine, The Washington Post, and WIRED, amongst others. Charles lectures in Photography at Nottingham Trent University.
 
Sophie Fuggle is Senior Lecturer in French at Nottingham Trent University. She is currently an AHRC early career leadership fellow (2018-19), leading the project ‘Postcards from the bagne’. Her current research focuses on representations of incarceration with specific focus on restoration initiatives at sites related to France’s former penal colonies in French Guiana and New Caledonia. In 2017 she was awarded a British Academy/Leverhulme small grant for preliminary work on this. Images from her fieldwork in French Guiana are available here: http://sophie-fuggle.format.com.
 
Laura McAtackney is an Associate Professor in Sustainable Heritage Management at Aarhus University, Denmark. An archaeologist by training, her current research uses contemporary and historical archaeological approaches, and its heritage implications, to explore areas as diverse as material barriers in post-conflict Northern Ireland, female experiences of political imprisonment during the Irish Civil War and race/social relations on early modern Montserrat in the Caribbean (the latter is as a member of the SLAM project at Wayne State University and Brown University in the US). She created and maintains a website on female experiences of imprisonment during the Irish Civil War http://kilmainhamgaolgraffiti.com. 
 
Claire Reddleman is postdoctoral researcher on the AHRC-funded project ‘Postcards from the bagne’, and a photographic artist. She is based in London. 
 
Maryse Tennant is Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Canterbury ChristChurch University. Her current research focuses on prison history, prison heritage and offender life stories looking in particular at the history of the former Canterbury Prison which was purchased by the University in 2013. 
 
Khadija von Zinnenburg Carroll is an artist and Professorial Chair of Global Art at the University of Birmingham. She is the author of the books Art in the Time of Colony (2014); The Importance of Being Anachronistic (2016), Botanical Drift: Protagonists of the Invasive Herbarium (2018), and the forthcoming Bordered Lives, based on her play Men in Waiting, and the Immigration Detention Archive made in residence with Border Criminologies and now at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford. Her most recent artworks about institutions and sites of incarceration have been shown at the Konzerttheatre Bern, Pesta Boneka Festival Indonesia, Styrx, Bonavero, University of Cambridge, and Silver Sehnsucht. Her installations and performances have also been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, ICA London, Extracity, HKW, Marrakech Biennale, Savvy, LUX, Chisenhale, SPACE, Project Art Centre Gallery Dublin, and the Casablanca Film Festival.
 

 

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